L’Oréal offers a motorized makeup applicator for people with limited mobility

The Hapta device has motion sensors that allow it to stabilize the user's hand (L'Oréal)

The Hapta device has motion sensors that allow it to stabilize the user’s hand (L’Oréal)

L’Oréal has unveiled a motorized, hand-held device that allows people with limited hand and arm mobility to apply makeup evenly.

The slim new product uses motion sensors and magnetic caps that allow makeup to be applied in 360 degrees of rotation and 180 degrees of flexion, according to the company.

The move is part of the beauty industry’s push to develop products for people with disabilities – an overall untapped market believed to be worth $1.2 trillion (£990 billion). So far, these efforts have mainly focused on creating ergonomic products, such as makeup brushes that can bend and are easier to grip, and easy-to-open moisturizers.

L’Oréal says the new Hapta device targets the 50 million people worldwide who have limited motor skills, including those with cerebral palsy or stroke.

The product, presented at the CES technology show in Las Vegas, will be tested with a lipstick applicator from L’Oréal Lancôme later this year.

In developing Hapta, L’Oréal received a helping hand from Google’s sister company Verily, which specializes in the life sciences. Verily has created all kinds of futuristic technology, including smart shoes that detect falls and contact lenses that test the blood glucose levels of people with diabetes.

The motorized lipstick applicator will arrive this year from the Lancôme company owned by L'Oréal (L'Oreal)

The motorized lipstick applicator will arrive this year from the Lancôme company owned by L’Oréal (L’Oreal)

In the case of the L’Oréal make-up applicator, the product uses Verily technology, originally designed to stabilize and level utensils for people with disabilities. Google originally unveiled a smart spoon with these features back in 2014. Liftware’s so-called spoon relied on hundreds of algorithms that sensed how your hand was shaking and made adjustments to keep you balanced.

A consumer product, dubbed the Liftware series, followed later released in 2016. It now includes an assistive device for people with hand tremors or limited hand and arm mobility. Each device costs $195, with extra forks and spoons sold separately for $20.

L'Oréal's new makeup applicator appears to use the same technology as Verily's smart tools for people with conditions like Parkinson's (Verily)

L’Oréal’s new makeup applicator appears to use the same technology as Verily’s smart tools for people with conditions like Parkinson’s (Verily)

L’Oréal and Verily began collaborating on skincare tools and digital dermatology in January.

“Beautiful technology [is] revolutionizes the way we develop beauty products and services and enables greater personalization,” said Françoise Lehmann, global president of the Lancôme brand. “With Hapta, we’re going a step further by making beauty more accessible to use because everyone should have equal access to it.”

L'Oréal eyebrow make-up applicator enables a personalized look based on facial scans (L'Oréal)

L’Oréal eyebrow make-up applicator enables a personalized look based on facial scans (L’Oréal)

Also at CES, the cosmetics company announced the Brow Magic Applicator, which offers a personalized look for eyebrows based on facial scans from a bundled app.

The product has 2,400 small nozzles and a print resolution of up to 1,200 drops per inch. L’Oréal claims it can apply a precise brow shape in seconds and can be removed with a standard makeup remover. Brow Magic analyzes the shape and thickness of the user’s face to make recommendations for microblading, microshading or filler effects. The product is expected to appear later this year.

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